Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Andy's Wise Words for Fortune Tellers

I've been a Lenormand student for some time now, and absolutely love studying traditional card reading. You don't learn this kind of reading style by living in a vacuum - every student has a teacher (or two or three). I've learned principally from Andy Boroveshengra, a traditional reader living in England, and highly recommend his eBook "36 Cards" (available via Amazon). This afternoon I noticed his post about "Tips for Fortune Tellers" that I wanted to share here (with his permission):

"Three Tips for Fortune-Tellers.

ONE - never sell your soul, as the Oracle said: know thyself.

TWO - live: you cannot tell fortunes from an ivory tower; your instincts are honed by lean times, challenges and hardship.

THREE - less is more: cultivate a couple of methods, as a jack-of-all-trades is master-of-none."

Good advice, all around, and the second tip, in particular, is very fitting per my post earlier today (accessible by clicking here) about how life experience helps become a better predictive reader.

12 comments:

  1. Hmm, given men's notorious inability to multi-task, and as a woman who certainly does, I'd say I am neither Jack-of-all-trades nor Master-of-one, but rather Queen-of-many :D

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    1. Hah! Well, I suppose I'd agree with you. I like the point that there are so many techniques available, say, for reading the GT, that it's better to find several that you like, and become really comfortable with them, rather than trying to apply each and every possible technique to reading the same spread. I see it as mastering a few of those techniques rather than trying to be an expert at every one of them - more akin to finding your own reading style.

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    2. I see your point, and I like your description of it as finding the styles that fit best with your own way of reading. On the other hand, I think that it's good to experiment with different techniques, as something which you wouldn't normally think of or feel comfortable with can give you really interesting results. You might then go back to the styles you prefer, but I do love to experiment and expand my perspective :D

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    3. True that! As a relative newbie I feel that the only way I can really find my Lenormand style is by trying everything out and seeing what I like and what I don't prefer. And we never stop learning, otherwise we'll shrivel up!

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  2. I am assuming Chloe that your Queenly crown slipped, again. I said cultivate a few ie master something before moving on. Work at something. Learn about it beyond skimming Iris' course. But what do I know - being a man

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  3. I am assuming Chloe that your Queenly crown slipped, again. I said cultivate a few ie master something before moving on. Work at something. Learn about it beyond skimming Iris' course. But what do I know - being a man

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    1. I'm sorry if the smileys weren't enough to show my intent to be gently tongue-in-cheek, Andy. As for Iris Treppner, she isn't my favourite German author, though I enjoy both the Sibyl and her Erfolgsplaner especially. And she is closer to my understanding than Britta Kienle, with her unusual take on timing. My personal preference is for the style and interpretations of Fiechter, Drabeck and Jösten, though I also find Dumke interesting as the jump-off-point for a lot of what came later amongst German authors like Halina Kamm and Anne Biwer. Bergmann and Krüger are both useful for their books on the Grand Tableau, while Bergmann's latest "Die fabelhafte Welt des Lenormand" is interesting in its associations to mythology, art and tarot, though I don't always agree with how she combines then. And I love Yachour and Schäfer's idea of creating fairy tales around the Lenormand cards as an easier way to memorise the meanings! Which brings me back to my point, that some people learn most easily through a single focus, while others do better with a more comparative approach. Obviously, it would have taken much less time and money to simply skim Iris' online course, but where would be the fun in that?! ;)

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    3. Smiles and sarcasm do not detract from intent, Chloe. I know what you mean as do you.

      Listing authors do not grant authority to you. You are no better than Britta anymore than I am.

      I am not going to argue on Olivia's blog. But I had been prepared to give you respect before now, at least as a Lenormand and TABI peer. But I see now I was misguided. You deserve no respect at all.

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    4. Good luck with the Celtic. I'm sure Will Worthington will ensure it sells well.

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  4. Where you see authority, I see exploration. Perhaps we can agree to differ. Thank you for your good luck wishes, I am glad your eBook is doing well.

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